24 Apr 2020

Foundation Defends Michigan Teacher from Union Boss Money Grab as Union Sues for Dues Teacher Never Owed

Posted in News Releases

Foundation helps teacher respond to Michigan Education Association lawsuit seeking collection of ‘back dues’ from her after she resigned her union membership

Ann Arbor, MI (April 24, 2020) – With free legal aid from the National Right to Work Legal Defense Foundation, Ann Arbor-area teacher Deborah Wolter is defending herself against Michigan Educators Association (MEA) union lawyers who filed a lawsuit claiming she owes thousands of dollars in back dues, despite the fact that the purportedly owed dues are for a period after she resigned her union membership. Under Michigan’s Right to Work law, nonmembers cannot be required to make any payments of union dues or fees.

As her response to the union lawsuit notes, Wolter does not owe MEA any dues because she resigned her union membership in August 2014. Because MEA’s demands for dues violate Michigan’s Right to Work law, Wolter’s attorneys are fighting to dismiss the union’s false claims that she owes them anything.

MEA union lawyers are suing Wolter for not paying dues as a nonmember, while Wolter’s attorneys charge the union lawsuit violates Michigan’s Right to Work law—which protects nonmembers from being forced to pay union dues or fees and allows workers to cut off all dues payments after resigning their union membership.

Union lawyers further claim in their lawsuit that Wolter did not resign union membership before she stopped paying dues, despite Wolter’s August 2014 resignation. As her legal filings state, Wolter “terminated her membership in both law and fact,” and therefore does not owe MEA union bosses anything.

Last year, Foundation staff attorneys won a victory for two other teachers at Wolter’s school facing similar demands from officials of the Ann Arbor Education Association (AAEA), an MEA affiliate. In that case, the Michigan Court of Appeals ruled AAEA violated the rights of teachers Jeffrey Finnan and Cory Merante under Michigan’s Right to Work Law by demanding that they continue to pay union fees even though they had resigned their union membership.

Since Michigan passed its Right to Work law, which became effective in March 2013, Foundation staff attorneys have brought over 120 cases for Michigan workers subjected to coercive union boss tactics.

“It is despicable that Michigan union bosses yet again are demanding forced union dues in violation of Michigan’s Right to Work law,” commented National Right to Work Foundation President Mark Mix. “The National Right to Work Foundation is proud to stand with Michiganders who are exercising their rights under Michigan’s Right to Work law that makes union financial support strictly voluntary.”

22 Apr 2020

Michigan Rieth-Riley Workers Ask National Labor Relations Board to Stop Blocking Vote to Remove Unpopular IUOE Union

Posted in News Releases

Request for Review: NLRB Region in Detroit has let IUOE officials delay employee vote using unproven allegations against employer to block election

Detroit, MI (April 22, 2020) – With free legal aid from National Right to Work Legal Defense Foundation attorneys, Michigan-based employees of the Rieth-Riley Construction Company have petitioned the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) in Washington, DC, asking that they be allowed to exercise their right to hold a vote whether to oust the International Union of Operating Engineers (IUOE) Local 324 from their workplace.

Their request for review comes after NLRB Region 7 in Detroit held their petition for an election in abeyance based on unproven charges IUOE officials made, the majority more than one year ago, against Rieth-Riley. IUOE officials called a strike last July against Rieth-Riley, which has road construction projects across Michigan. However, many of its employees have exercised their right to continue working despite the union’s strike demands and are seeking to remove the union entirely.

The petition also comes after the NLRB amended its rules regarding how the agency deals with “blocking charges,” which are filed by union officials against employers in an attempt to stop rank-and-file employees from voting the union out.

The NLRB’s new rules acknowledge the inherent unfairness of the previous system, and in most circumstances will permit employees to have a vote despite union “blocking charges.” In the past, union officials could stay in power by blocking workers’ votes for months or even years while often unrelated allegations against employers were litigated. The new rule is set to go into effect this August, after being delayed two months due to what the Board said are COVID-19 concerns.

The employee who filed the union decertification petition, Rayalan Kent, recounts in his request for review that he and more than 30 percent of his fellow employees first tried to exercise their right to vote out IUOE Local 324 in March, when they submitted a petition for such a vote to NLRB Region 7. At that point, IUOE officials and Rieth-Riley had been bargaining for well over a year and had not yet finalized a contract, even after a July 2019 strike order from IUOE union bosses.

Although the petition has more than enough employee signatures to trigger the vote under the Board’s rules, Region 7 officials told Kent in an email that the election would be delayed “pending the investigation” of charges filed by IUOE officials against the employer. However, the Region provided Kent no information regarding the charges or “why they rose to the requisite level to block the employees’ petition.” The request for review also points out that the exercise of Kent’s and his coworkers’ rights to a vote could be delayed “apparently indefinitely” due to COVID-19 related delays in “blocking charge” cases.

According to the request for review, the three “blocking charges” filed by union bosses against Rieth-Riley allege behavior that took place almost two years ago in some instances and have no “causal connection” to the employees’ decertification petition. The Board’s delay of the election based on these unproven charges, the request argues, denies Rieth-Riley employees their right under the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) to vote out a union they disapprove of.

To vindicate the employees’ rights, especially in light of the new rule regarding “blocking charges,” the request asks the NLRB to “order Region 7 to proceed to a secret-ballot election without further delay.” The request points out that Region 7’s decision to continue blocking this election ignores “Petitioner and his fellow employees’ desire to be free from Local 324’s representation” and sacrifices “the employees’ free choice rights to an unpopular union’s claims.”

When it issued the new rule earlier this month, the NLRB cited dozens of times comments the Right to Work Foundation had submitted earlier this year. Those comments pointed out that the NLRB’s old rules regarding “blocking charges” served only to keep union bosses in power while forbidding employees from exercising their right to vote to eliminate unwanted unions, were merely the product of forced unionism-friendly board decisions, and were not required by the NLRA.

Kent and his coworkers are not the only Michigan workers dealing with election delays from NLRB Region 7. Lansing, MI transportation worker Sandy Harris is also asking the NLRB in Washington to apply the new rules regarding “blocking charges” to allow a vote to remove Amalgamated Transit Union (ATU) bosses to occur at her workplace. As with Kent’s case, the vote was postponed without even a hearing as to whether the union’s charges have merit or if they have a causal connection to the employees’ petition for an election.

“These cases show again how union officials, often with assistance of NLRB Region officials, have abused the NLRB’s ‘blocking charge’ policy to nullify workers’ right under federal law to vote out unwanted unions,” said National Right to Work Foundation President Mark Mix. “The NLRB in Washington must take immediate action to protect employees’ free choice rights by not only reversing the decision to delay implementation of the new rule, but also by applying the new rule to all cases currently blocked under the old ‘blocking charge’ policy.”

21 Apr 2020

Right to Work Foundation Celebrates West Virginia Supreme Court Decision Upholding Right to Work Protections

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In union boss-backed case seeking to overturn Right to Work, Foundation filed 10 legal briefs defending law on behalf of workers

Charleston, WV (April 21, 2020) – The West Virginia Supreme Court has just unanimously upheld the state’s Right to Work protections, which ensure that no Mountain State worker is forced to pay dues or fees to a union as a condition of employment.

National Right to Work Foundation President Mark Mix issued the following statement on the West Virginia Supreme Court’s decision:

“Today’s decision marks a great victory for Mountain State employees. The West Virginia Supreme Court rejected outrageous arguments from union lawyers that union hierarchies have a ‘right’ to extort money from workers forced to accept their so-called ‘representation,’ and in doing so protected the right of rank-and-file workers to freely choose whether or not to financially support a union. The court drew from a wide base of well-reasoned precedent for this conclusion, including the Foundation-won Janus v. AFSCME U.S. Supreme Court decision.

“Sustaining Right to Work ensures that employees across the state, including the workers whom the Foundation filed briefs for in this case, can rest assured that they cannot be fired for refusing to subsidize the agendas of union officials that they disapprove of, while permitting employees to financially support unions if they choose to.”

In the decision, Justice Evan Jenkins wrote for the majority that Right to Work “does not violate constitutional rights of association, property, or liberty” and that states are “expressly authorized under federal law” to prohibit union bosses from requiring dues or fees as a condition of employment. Four of the five justices also concluded that the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in Janus v. AFSCME, which was argued and won by Foundation staff attorneys, required them to uphold the law.

After the West Virginia Legislature overrode Governor Tomblin’s veto on the law and became the 26th Right to Work state on February 4, 2016, the National Right to Work Foundation announced an offer of free legal aid to any employees seeking to assert their rights under the new law. The Foundation also created a special task force to defend the West Virginia law, which went into full effect on July 1, 2016.

Later that year, lawyers for several state unions brought a case called West Virginia AFL-CIO, et al. v. Governor James C. Justice, et al. in an attempt to overturn the popular law. Polling consistently shows that Americans back Right to Work laws. A scientific survey also found that eighty percent of union members supported the Right to Work principle that union membership and dues payment should be voluntary and not required as a condition of employment.

Judge Jennifer Bailey of the Kanawha County Circuit Court granted a preliminary injunction on the law on February 23, 2017, at the behest of union lawyers. Similar arguments to the union lawyers’ primary arguments in this case for why the Right to Work protections for workers should be overturned had already been rejected by a Federal Court of Appeals and the Indiana Supreme Court, and also ran counter to nearly 70 years of legal precedent upholding the constitutionality of state Right to Work laws, including U.S. Supreme Court decisions.

The case was appealed to the West Virginia Supreme Court by attorneys for the state. Foundation staff attorneys filed 10 legal briefs for workers whose rights would be at risk if the law was repealed, including Reginald Gibbs, an employee of the Greenbrier Hotel and Casino, and Donna Harper, a nursing assistant at the Genesis HealthCare Tygert Center.

This case is the latest legal battle in the Foundation’s long history of effectively defending Right to Work laws in state and federal court from union boss attacks. In addition to West Virginia, Foundation staff attorneys have successfully pursued legal action in recent years to defend and enforce new Right to Work laws in Indiana, Michigan, Wisconsin and Kentucky, all of which have passed Right to Work protections for employees since 2012. In Michigan alone, Foundation staff attorneys have assisted employees in over 100 cases since Right to Work went into effect in early 2013.

17 Apr 2020

Swedish Medical Center Employees Hit SEIU Union with Federal Charges for Forced Union Dues Policies

Posted in News Releases

Union requires workers to request appointment in writing, appear in person, and provide photo ID just to receive paperwork about stopping union dues

Seattle, WA (April 17, 2020) – Employees of Seattle’s Swedish Medical Center have filed charges against Service Employees’ International Union (SEIU) 1199NW regarding union officials’ attempts to force the workers to pay union dues beyond what can be required by federal law. The charges were filed at the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) Region 19 in Seattle with free legal aid from National Right to Work Legal Defense Foundation staff attorneys.

Charges filed for Daniel Dalison, one of the two workers, recounts that SEIU bosses ignored his attempts to resign his union membership and pay reduced dues after he had discovered those rights. For months the union flouted his requests and kept seizing full union dues.

Dalison contends that the union officials have denied his rights under the Foundation-won CWA v. Beck Supreme Court decision. Beck mandates that private sector workers who choose to refrain from formal union membership can only be required to pay the part of dues directly related to the union’s bargaining functions. Union bosses also must inform employees of the reduced amount of union fees they can pay under Beck by objecting to formal union membership, and must provide an independent audit of the union’s expenses.

Because Washington State has not enacted Right to Work protections for its employees, Dalison and his coworkers can be forced to pay a fee to the union as a condition of employment.

Dalison’s charge explains that when he asked for copies of any union documents he had signed, union officials informed him that they have a policy requiring employees to “apply in writing and appear in person with a photo ID” to get their own paperwork regarding membership and dues check off authorization documents.

Dalison argues that this policy exists only to “delay and hinder employees from exercising their rights to resign union membership and revoke their dues checkoff authorizations.”

A second employee, Roger White, similarly charges that SEIU bosses have disregarded two of his attempts to resign his union membership and exercise his Beck rights. Despite admitting to him that “35% of the dues were spent on political and nonrepresentational activities,” SEIU officials did not reduce his dues for months, according to his charge. White also argues that his second request should have been effective in revoking his dues checkoff authorization, as a strike was going on at the time and there was no contract in effect between Swedish Medical Center and the SEIU, nullifying any obligation he had to pay dues over that period.

Both charges note that SEIU 1199NW is a “repeat [National Labor Relations Act] violator.” This is the second round of federal charges against SEIU 1199NW for Dalison, who filed charges in January 2020 asserting that union officials had never given employees “adequate notice of their rights under Beck” and had refused to stop all dues deductions when he revoked his dues checkoff authorization during the strike.

Another employee of Swedish Medical Center, NancyEllen Elster, won a settlement with Foundation aid against SEIU 1199NW bosses in October 2019. NLRB Region 19 had found merit in Elster’s charges that SEIU bosses had never given a proper Beck rights notice to employees, and had denied her request to pay the reduced dues amount under Beck. The settlement was supposed to rectify these rights violations, but SEIU officials are apparently now in violation of that settlement.

“Given the unprecedented challenges healthcare workers currently face, it is especially outrageous that they also have to deal with SEIU union bosses violating their rights just to stuff the union’s coffers with more forced dues,” observed National Right to Work Foundation President Mark Mix. “NLRB Region 19 must act swiftly and decisively to ensure that SEIU officials are held accountable for the continuing rights violations at Swedish Medical Center, but these cases demonstrate the abuses that inevitably occur when union officials are granted the power to force employees to subsidize their activities or be terminated from employment.”

15 Apr 2020

National Labor Relations Board to Prosecute NABET-CWA Union for Demanding $10,000 from ESPN Cameraman

Posted in News Releases

Complaint charges NABET-CWA union bosses failed to provide mandated breakdown of fees, while demanding cameraman pay up or be fired

Portland, OR (April 15, 2020) – The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) Region 19 in Seattle has issued a complaint in the case of an Oregon-based ABC/ESPN cameraman, who in July 2019 charged National Association of Broadcast Employees and Technicians (NABET-CWA) Local 51 union officials with demanding thousands of dollars in union fees from him in violation of his rights. The cameraman filed his charges with free legal aid from National Right to Work Legal Defense Foundation staff attorneys.

The cameraman, Jeremy Brown, asserted in his charge against NABET bosses that it had infringed his rights under the Right to Work Foundation-won CWA v. Beck Supreme Court decision. Beck mandates that private sector workers who choose to refrain from formal union membership can only be forced to pay the portion of dues directly germane to the union’s bargaining functions. It also requires union bosses to inform employees of the reduced amount of union fees they can pay if they object to formal union membership and to provide an independent audit of the union’s expenses.

Because Brown works mostly in states that have not enacted Right to Work protections for employees, he can be required to pay a fee to the union as a condition of employment. However, union officials can only require workers to pay the portion of dues Beck allows and must follow Beck procedures before seizing such forced fees from workers who are not union members.

The complaint notes that Brown began working as a “freelance daily hire” for ABC/ESPN in about 2016. In February 2019, he received a letter from NABET officials informing him he was in a monopoly bargaining unit under the union’s control, and that he must pay an initiation fee of approximately $6,431. In April of the same year, union bosses sent him another letter alleging that Brown also owed $3,429.60 in unpaid union dues from December 2016 to January 2019. This letter threatened that Brown would not be “eligible for future employment” if he refused to pay.

On April 4, Brown sent an email to the president of the NABET local objecting to full union dues and demanding his Beck rights. Throughout April 2019 and into June 2019, Brown continued to follow up with union officials on his request, but to date has received no response.

NLRB Region 19’s complaint declares that NABET officials have violated the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) by denying Brown his Beck rights. This includes failing to provide Brown “with a good faith determination of the sum amount of reduced fees and dues” that union nonmembers can pay, failing to provide a “detailed apportionment” of the union’s expenses, and not informing Brown of the proper way to submit his Beck objection after his multiple attempts to do so.

As a remedy, the complaint seeks an order requiring NABET bosses “to reimburse Charging Party for non-representational dues and fees collected since April 2019” and take only the portion of fees allowed by Beck from his paycheck in the future. The NLRB has scheduled a hearing before an Administrative Law Judge (ALJ) in Brown’s case for September 29, 2020.

“NABET bosses threatened Jeremy Brown’s livelihood just so they could stuff thousands of his hard-earned dollars into their pockets in clear violation of his rights,” observed National Right to Work Foundation President Mark Mix. “Although we are encouraged that NLRB Region 19 has taken steps to prosecute the union for this blatant malfeasance, cases like this demonstrate why every state must enact Right to Work protections for their workers so none are forced to subsidize union activities as a condition of employment.”

9 Apr 2020

Right to Work Foundation Files Comments Urging FLRA to Eliminate Restrictions on Federal Employees’ Right to Cut Off Union Dues

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Federal statute must be interpreted to protect employees’ First Amendment rights under Janus

Washington, DC (April 9, 2020) – Today the National Right to Work Legal Defense Foundation filed comments with the Federal Labor Relations Authority (FLRA) supporting the agency’s proposed final rule to permit federal employees to exercise their right to cut off union dues deductions from their paychecks any time one year or more after authorizing such deductions. The comments are submitted in response to the FLRA’s February request for comments on the proposed rule.

The FLRA noted in its request that such a standard would adhere better to the statute governing dues deductions for federal employees. It would also stop federal union officials from limiting workers to just a small “escape period” once every year in the exercise of their right to end dues deductions. On the other hand, the proposed rule would not prevent any employee from voluntarily paying union dues.

The Foundation supports the proposed rule’s elimination of non-statutory restrictions on employees’ right to stop union dues deductions because the rule would effectuate employees’ right to choose whether to support a union under both the applicable federal statute and the First Amendment.

In the Foundation-won Janus v. AFSCME U.S. Supreme Court decision, the Court ruled that public employees have a First Amendment right not to subsidize union speech and that the government violates that right by seizing union dues from nonconsenting employees. The proposed rule will be a step forward to bringing federal labor law into compliance with the Supreme Court’s decision in Janus.

“We are encouraged by the FLRA’s attempt to stop federal union bosses from unfairly restricting the rights of the workers they claim to represent just to fill their coffers with more dues,” commented National Right to Work Foundation President Mark Mix. “However, more still needs to be done. To fully comply with the Janus decision, the FLRA also should ensure that affirmative and knowing consent is obtained from federal workers before union dues are deducted from their paychecks so none are compelled to support union activities against their wishes.”

The FLRA is also currently accepting comments on whether or not union officials can legally use official time, which occurs when union officials are paid by taxpayers while doing union business, on lobbying activities. The agency has sought those comments – due April 24th – because of a request filed by the National Right to Work Legal Defense Foundation which argued that such activities violate longstanding federal law.

9 Apr 2020

Labor Board Rules in Favor of New Jersey Nursing Home Employees Seeking Vote to Remove SEIU Union

Posted in News Releases

Union officials attempted to use technicality to block employees’ right to vote despite clear showing workers opposed union

Shrewsbury, NJ (April 9, 2020) – With free legal aid from National Right to Work Legal Defense Foundation staff attorneys, Loundy Saint Louis, an employee of the Meridian Health Nursing and Rehabilitation facility in Shrewsbury has successfully petitioned the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) for a vote to remove the Service Employees International Union (SEIU) 1199 at her workplace. In a ruling Monday the NLRB overturned an earlier decision by a regional office in Newark, which had blocked her original petition despite a sufficient showing of interest by the employees for a vote.

According to the NLRB’s decision, a different employee of the nursing home had submitted a petition for a vote to remove the SEIU union on June 11, 2019, which contained signatures from enough employees to trigger the election. Though that employee withdrew the petition a week later, NLRB Region 22 maintained possession of the employees’ showing of interest in having the vote. Loundy Saint Louis then stepped up and submitted a new decertification petition on June 25. She asked the Regional Director to schedule a vote based on the recent showing of interest that it still had in its possession from the prior petition.

The Regional Director sided with union bosses and rebuffed Saint Louis’ petition, on the grounds that the employee that submitted the first petition “had not instructed or requested the Region to transfer the showing of interest to the Petitioner,” according to the NLRB’s decision.

Saint Louis then filed a petition for review, which pointed out that the prior petitioner’s permission is “irrelevant to whether the showing of interest is valid” in proving there is sufficient interest among the employees in a vote whether to oust the union, and that Saint Louis was merely acting for her coworkers.

The full NLRB in Washington granted Saint Louis’ request for review filed by National Right to Work Foundation staff attorneys. It ruled that “the petitioner in a decertification case merely acts ‘[on] behalf of employees’” and that the showing of interest in the earlier petition “still reflects the wishes of the employees.”

The Board reversed Region 22’s dismissal of Saint Louis’ petition and ordered that the Region take “further appropriate action” consistent with the Board’s decision, i.e., schedule the requested election.

This decision comes after the NLRB issued a final rule last week which removed some of the barriers employees face when trying to exercise their right to vote out a union that they oppose. These reforms, long-advocated for by the National Right to Work Foundation, included a reform in how the NLRB handles union “blocking charges” filed against employers with the intent of stopping employee attempts to decertify a union.

The final rule also substantially eliminates the “voluntary recognition bar,” which union bosses manipulate to block workers from requesting a secret ballot election after a union is installed as the monopoly bargaining agent through an abuse-prone “card check” drive. In justifying these rule changes the NLRB cited the Foundation’s comments submitted during the rulemaking process dozens of times.

“Although this victory is certainly good news, it is outrageous that SEIU union bosses were able to delay for months the right of Ms. Saint Louis and her coworkers to vote to decertify the union when, as the NLRB observed, there was clear evidence that more than enough workers were interested in having such an election,” observed National Right to Work Foundation President Mark Mix. “As the NLRB pointed out in its decision, mere technicalities like a change in petitioner should never serve as grounds to erase proof that a sufficient number of workers are interested in a decertification election.”

8 Apr 2020

Michigan Worker Petitions NLRB to Apply New “Blocking Charge” Rule Protecting Right of Workers to Remove Unwanted Unions

Posted in News Releases

Workers blocked from simply holding a vote to remove unpopular ATU union for months following union bosses’ unproven claims

Lansing, MI (April 8, 2020) – A Lansing transportation worker has just submitted a petition to the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) in Washington, D.C., requesting that the Board permit her and her coworkers to vote whether to remove the Amalgamated Transit Union (ATU) from power at their workplace. The petition was filed with free legal aid from National Right to Work Legal Defense Foundation attorneys and responds to “blocking charges” ATU officials filed against her employer which have delayed the election.

The petition comes after the NLRB issued a final rule last week reforming the process by which union “blocking charges” are handled. “Blocking charges” are filed by union officials to prevent rank-and-file employees from exercising their right to vote whether to remove a union. The new rules generally permit employees to proceed with a vote whenever they demonstrate the necessary showing of interest. In the past unions could stay in power by blocking workers’ votes for months or even years while often unrelated allegations against employers were litigated. The new rule is set to go into effect this June.

According to this petition, the employee, Sandy Harris, filed a request for an election to remove the union in November 2019. Before her request was filed, the petition says, ATU union bosses filed “blocking charges” against her employer, Transdev Services. The NLRB Regional Director in Detroit then blocked the vote from taking place without an investigation or a hearing into whether the charges have merit. Harris’ petition notes that five months have now passed since an election was requested and that further delays are likely to occur now due to the impact of coronavirus on the NLRB’s operations.

In light of the NLRB’s new rules, Harris’ petition contends that the NLRB should process the employees’ request for a decertification election now and permit them to vote as soon as reasonably possible. This, according to the petition, would “vindicate the employees’ right to petition for a decertification election” under the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA), and prevent them from being “stuck in limbo” while waiting for the new rules to take effect this June. The petition also points out that union lawyers could and are likely to challenge the NLRB’s new rules in court, which could further slow the process.

The NLRB cited comments the Foundation submitted earlier this year dozens of times when it issued the final rule last week. Those comments pointed out that the NLRB’s old rules regarding “blocking charges” served only to keep union bosses in power while forbidding employees from exercising their right to vote to eliminate unwanted unions, and were merely the product of forced unionism-friendly board decisions, and not required by the NLRA itself.

“NLRB Region 7, by clinging to outdated, union boss-friendly rules, has allowed the ATU to remain in power at Ms. Harris’ workplace while needlessly stifling Ms. Harris’ and her coworkers’ right to vote out an unwanted union from their workplace,” commented National Right to Work Foundation President Mark Mix. “The NLRB should quickly enforce the new protections for employees.”

“It is outrageous that union officials continue to contend that workers’ right under the National Labor Relations Act to a decertification vote should be restricted based on unproven allegations of employer conduct,” added Mix.

4 Apr 2020

Foundation in the Wall Street Journal: More Changes Necessary to Protect Workers’ Right to Vote Out Unwanted Unions

Posted in Blog

After the National Right to Work Foundation filed comments in January in support of policies to protect workers, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) has issued its final rule eliminating some barriers that prevented workers from being able to decertify a union they oppose.

Late last year, National Right to Work Foundation President Mark Mix wrote in the Wall Street Journal encouraging the NLRB to remove such barriers for workers by highlighting actual examples of how these types of NLRB rules hurt working men and women across the country:

A variety of other nonstatutory policies, doctrines and “bars” prevent workers from holding votes to oust unions they oppose. In many cases, the policies are applied one after the other, blocking escape routes.

A majority of workers at a Wisconsin trucking company experienced this over the past two years. First, they were blocked from removing their union by the so-called voluntary-recognition bar. This stops workers from decertifying a union for up to a year after the union is installed through “card check”—a procedure that avoids the need for a secret ballot and makes workers vulnerable to union intimidation.

Then, after waiting a year for that bar to expire, the Wisconsin workers found they had been merged by Teamsters officials into a multicompany nationwide bargaining unit of about 24,000 workers. Suddenly the petition to oust the local union was 7,000 signatures short—for a workplace with fewer than 10 union workers. Last month the NLRB declined the Wisconsin workers’ appeal, though a majority of voting board members signaled they would revisit the “merger doctrine” policy in the future.

Mix went on to discuss more of the bureaucratically-created policies, including the recently eliminated “blocking charge” policy, that allow union bosses to prevent workers from choosing who represents them:

Other workers face other hurdles: The “settlement bar” blocks a decertification vote because of an NLRB settlement to which the workers weren’t a party; the “successor bar” blocks a vote for up to a year after a company is acquired; the “contract bar” blocks a vote for up to three years after a union contract is forged; and a “blocking charge” blocks a vote while union allegations against a company are pending. None of these are required by law.

The NLRB is addressing the voluntary-recognition bar and blocking charges through the current rule-making process, but the other policies are similarly destructive of workers’ legal right to vote out a union that lacks majority backing. Congress should act to protect workers from being trapped in union ranks they oppose, but in the meantime the NLRB has the authority to eliminate these barriers.

After the Foundation’s comments and advocacy, the NLRB has finally removed the “blocking charge” and “voluntary recognition bar” rules, but there is more work to be done to protect workers and remove barriers.

1 Apr 2020

Worker Advocate Encouraged by National Labor Relations Board Rule Rolling Back Barriers to Workers Voting Out Unions

Posted in News Releases

Reform follows changes long advocated by National Right to Work Foundation, which has litigated hundreds of cases for workers seeking to oust unwanted unions

Washington, DC (April 1, 2020) – Citing comments from the National Right to Work Legal Defense Foundation, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) today formally issued a final rule eliminating some of the barriers that workers face when attempting to exercise their right to vote to remove an unwanted union.

National Right to Work Foundation President Mark Mix issued the following statement on the NLRB’s final rule:

While this NLRB still has much more to do, this long-awaited rule represents a significant step forward towards fully protecting the statutory right of employees under the Act to remove a union opposed by a majority of workers.

The blocking charge policy that is finally being modified has always been particularly odious in its treatment of employee rights, in that it allows union officials’ allegations against an employer to be grounds for blocking the statutory rights of employees who are not accused of any wrongdoing. Needless to say, in any other context, union bosses would be howling about employer conduct being used as grounds for blocking employees’ rights under the Act, yet here they support nullifying workers’ rights on the basis of any unproven allegation.

There are still additional non-statutory barriers to decertification that should to be eliminated, but we are encouraged that the Board took this step and thankful it made modifications to the proposed rule as advocated by the Foundation in its comments.

The rule reforms how the NLRB deals with union “blocking charges,” which are filed by union officials to prevent rank-and-file employees from exercising their right to vote to remove a union. Under the old rules, unions could block workers’ requested votes from taking place for months or even years by making allegations against the employer.

Under the new rule, union unfair labor practice charges cannot stall a vote from taking place. Additionally, and in apparent response to the Foundation’s comments, the NLRB modified its proposed rule so that in most cases ballots will be counted and not impounded, with the tallies released promptly.

The NLRB also substantially eliminated the so-called “voluntary recognition bar,” which was used by union officials to block workers from requesting a secret ballot election after a union was installed as the monopoly bargaining agent through an abuse-prone “card check” drive that bypassed the NLRB-supervised election process. The Trump NLRB did so by reinstating a system secured by Foundation staff attorneys for workers in the 2007 Dana Corp. NLRB decision. Although thousands of workers used the Dana process to secure secret ballot votes after being unionized through abusive card checks, the Obama NLRB voided employees’ Dana rights in 2010.

Additionally, the NLRB adopted the changes supported by the Foundation’s January comments to crack down on construction industry schemes through which employers and union bosses unilaterally install a union in a workplace without first providing proof of majority union support among the workers. Foundation staff attorneys represented a victim of such a scheme in a key case (Colorado Fire Sprinkler, Inc.) that ended when a U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals panel unanimously reversed the Obama Board and ruled for the worker who had been unionized despite no evidence of majority employee support for the union.